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Upav: Belgian travel agents wants to keep holding their

Upav: Belgian travel agents wants to keep holding their

Colin,Really good stuff. I've been following this industry for almost 10 years (pretty much since Dennis Tito started it all, imo) and have not seen too many clear, practical, realistic (but ambitious) yses pertaining to microgravity business opportunities. Yours here is on the money, my friend.I've had several similar type conversations with some of the founders of 'NewSpace' companies (e.g. in Mojave) and you are absolutely right -- they are busy with the physics, the welding, the engineering but either don't know how or couldn't really care less about the 'retail' side as you put it. I think this is the result of being the 'children' -- ideologically-speaking -- of NASA. Which, as we know, has made tremendous technological strides without the burden of serious capital constraints. They would complain that their budget was reduced but when you start out in the 9-figure range, not exactly such a bad budget to begin with.Contrast that with the aforementioned grassroots start-ups out in Mojave, New Mexico, or Texas and well...they're really having to wait for that next Ikea sale for office furniture if you catch my drift...What will enable a Silicon Valley of NewSpace to really happen -- will be an embracing of your ysis above. Space tourism will make the headlines -- when Brangelina kiss in zero-g on SpaceShipTwo -- that will be some big headlines. And this is a good thing -- a very good thing -- for the NewSpace industry.But for the industry to really flourish, to become something large and viable and important, I believe, as you so articulately explain above, will be this microgravity research. Btw, I was actually slated to go to Boulder for the Next-Gen event but work has prevented that (and I'm not happy about it!)I noticed that your ysis focused on research with universities (a logical place to begin). However, I have been doing some informal, empirical research by talking with a few folks in private companies (e.g. pharmaceutical, biotech, etc.) to find out what kind of cost/kg would start appealing to them.Naturally, the same issues arise with those folks as with the universities: reliability, frequency of use, and, of course, cost.If you'd care to discuss this further, please let me know. I am very impressed by your ysis above.RDRD:I agree that pharma could be a huge market. probably willing to pay more per flight and wanting more flights (the biggest differentiator!)Frankly, the reason i have not focused on them more, is my lack of contacts within the industry. sure, love to talk to you further. anything appropriate for the whole community, i would love to see posted here for all to benefit (i am focused on open source as much as is possible). email me for anything else: cdoughan (at) gmail dot comFrom Next Gen Suborbital conference this week in Colorado:Thought you might find it interesting that both XCOR rep and Space-X rep said that suborbital microgravity researchers and the commercial space companies that will enable them to get into micro-g will need "brokers, integrators, marketers to manage payloads" (Max Vozoff of Space-X); "major opportunity for groups to step up as payload integrators" (Khaki McKee of XCOR).RD:Thanks for that. I also agree with Rocketplane's Chuck Lauer when he talks about standards. if not the mideck locker by itself, then standards that can integrate with the MDL will be key. "middeck lockers are the chariot wheels of the 21st C. Will be using that standard for decades to come"Yepper.It's interesting that you say "I think the [CubeLab/CubeSat] technology ports very well into the suborbital arena as well." Kentucky Space is also doing a sub-orbital CubeSat demonstration mission called SOCEM in March: http://ssl.engr.uky.edu/suborbital/socemAnthony:In fact, I think Kentucky Space and Bob Twiggs could be one of the key players by establishing and expanding a set of experimental standards. first start with the experiment buses that I mention in my post, but then expand to include a standard set of mix and match components: a standard micro-camera compatible with any of the buses for experiment observation during flight. and then add other plug-N-play components (power supplies, communication gear, atmospheric sampling components, etc.). Think of it this way: first I bought my I-Pod. Now I can buy a leather case, speakers, a car charger...there may be a business model for selling these additional components. now that would be a fun spreadsheet ysis to perform! :)great post! BLOG_CMT_createIframe('https://www.blogger.com/rpc_relay.html');







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