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Hydraulic Patient Lift with Six Point Cradle Drive Medical

Hydraulic Patient Lift with Six Point Cradle Drive Medical

Every day, our paramedics are on the road responding to calls. They respond to over 50,000 calls each year and they do an outstanding job with their dedication and hard work.During Paramedic Week (May 19-25) and beyond, don’t forget to slow down, signal, move to the right and pull over when you see the flashing lights of an ambulance or any other emergency vehicle. Moving over and slowing down is so simple and it can play such a big factor in someone’s life.Paramedics are in important and valued part of our health care system and community. They are part of the reason why Halton Region is a great place to live, work, raise a family and retire.The following sections of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act apply to all emergency services.1. When you see an emergency vehicle approaching with its lights on, slow down and move to the right as soon as it’s safe.In an emergency situation, seconds could mean the difference between life and death so a clear, unblocked lane to the patient’s location is important.2. When you approach an accident with emergency responders on scene, slow down and safely move away from the accident.By moving away from an accident scene, we are ensuring paramedic and other emergency responders’ road-side safety and allowing them to focus on the medical needs of the patients.Failure to comply with either of these laws could cost you significant fines and demerit points. Worse than that, failure to comply could have a negative effect on someone’s life.The theme of this year’s Paramedic Week is “Health Care in Motion”. Let’s keep them safely in motion!For more information about Halton Region Paramedic Services, dial 311 or visit www.halton.ca/paramedic. If it’s an emergency, always dial 911.If you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. You can also find me on Twitter @garycarrhalton or on Facebook. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”When faced with a medical emergency, there are many things that can run through your mind. Whether you are a witness to the emergency or if you are the emergency, calling 911 should be your first priority. This is especially important if the emergency might be a heart attack.If you think you or someone else is having a heart attack, DO NOT DRIVE TO THE HOSPITAL. Call 911 for an ambulance.Most Common Signs of a Heart Attack*Women often don’t feel any chest pain.Less Common Signs of a Heart AttackIt is important to know the signs of a heart attack. Don’t risk your life or someone else’s. Call 911 immediately.  Halton’s paramedics are highly skilled and can begin treating a person suffering from a heart attack immediately.Upon reaching the patient, the Paramedics can perform tests to determine if the type of heart attack is one that can be most effectively treated in a regional cardiac centre, either in Mississauga or Hamilton. If the heart attack is considered a “STEMI,” the patient will be quickly taken to a cardiac centre where they undergo a surgical procedure to restore blood flow to the heart. This is called the STEMI Program and we are very fortunate to have it. The STEMI program is showing positive outcomes when these patients are transported directly to the cardiac centre by paramedics.If a person were to have a family member or friend drive them to a hospital, there would be delays in getting the patient the proper cardiac care. Any delay decreases a person’s chance of surviving a heart attack. Calling 911 is your best option.In 2012, the Halton Region Paramedic Services created a series of educational videos for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillators which include:Please watch and share these videos.CPR is a skill that is easy to learn and can save a life. Halton Region Paramedic Services offers several options for learning CPR. There are other community organizations that offer training as well.As always, if you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at  gary.carr@halton.ca. You can also find me on Twitter @garycarrhalton or on Facebook. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”Great opportunities to help others seldom come, but small ones surround us every day. —  Sally KochIn an emergency situation, when someone is hurt and their life is danger, seconds matter. When you see an emergency vehicle approaching with their lights flashing, slow down, safely get out of the way and move to the right.Emergency vehicles include ambulances, police cruisers and fire trucks.Halton Region Emergency Medical Services (EMS) responds to more than 50,000 calls each year. Many of the emergency calls come during high-traffic times which presents a challenge in reaching the victims. Even with the 11 EMS stations and 20 vehicles throughout the Region, having a clear, unobstructed roadway is so important.We are very fortunate to have such great Emergency Medical Services in Halton Region. They are among the best in the province. For the past decade, Halton Region EMS has consistently met or been below the minimum required response times which are set according to the Province’s Ambulance Act.Meeting or being below the Provincial response time standard has a lot to do with the residents and commuters on the roads. As the Region’s population grows, it only natural that calls for paramedics will grow too. When you are out and about, be safe but mindful of your surroundings when in your car – you never know whose life depends on it. Slow down and move to the right when you see an emergency vehicle approaching you from behind.Time is always essential. A one or two minute delay will feel like an eternity for those involved in a car-crash or those doing bystander CPR on a cardiac arrest victim.With everyone’s help, Halton Region will continue to be a great place to live, work, raise a family and retire.Watch our video. As always, if you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. You can also find me on Twitter @garycarrhalton or on Facebook. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”At Halton Region, the safety and protection of our residents is a top priority.  Halton Region, the City of Burlington, the Town of Halton Hills, the Town of Milton and the Town of Oakville, work together year round with our emergency preparedness partners to plan for and ensure a coordinated response to emergencies.  Our goal is to create and maintain an effective emergency preparedness program that provides for the safety and well-being of Halton residents. On Sunday, February 26, a VIA Rail Canada train en route from Niagara Falls to Toronto was involved in an accident in the City of Burlington.  The accident resulted in injuries to passengers and three fatalities, all VIA Rail crew members who were in the locomotive at the time of the accident. On behalf of Halton Regional Council, I would like to offer my sincere condolences to the families affected by this tragic accident. I would also like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation to Halton’s emergency responders, including the Halton Regional Police Service, Halton Emergency Medical Services and the Burlington Fire Department.  Since the incident, I have received several messages from residents affected by the accident commending your efforts for a quick and professional response.  To quote one woman, whose mother was a passenger on the train, “All of the first responders took the time, in a crisis situation, to keep her calm and composed and really seemed to go out of their way to treat her like a person, not just a ’case‘ they needed to move…she could not say enough about the amazing work of the first responders that she saw.”During the event, Halton Region and the City of Burlington’s Emergency Response plans worked just like they were supposed to. Halton Regional Police Services had 42 officers on site including Command, frontline officers, security, investigation staff, forensics, the Emergency Services Unit and the Mobile Command Unit with communications staff supporting them. The Burlington Fire Department had a total of four Chiefs and 45 responders on the scene over the course of the incident. Halton’s EMS response was coordinated among many jurisdictions, something that occurs regularly between units.  In this case, Halton EMS supplied seven ambulances, one Superintendent and two Deputy Chiefs.  Hamilton supplied an additional four ambulances and Toronto added one multiple patient bus and one Supervisor.  I would also like to acknowledge Peel Region EMS for sending ambulances into our area to help support any other emergency calls during the event, as well as the Red Cross and other community volunteers who stepped in to support our emergency responders on site.  One of the Region’s action items, as laid out in the Citizens’ Priorities – Halton Region’s 2011-2014 Action Plan, is to work with emergency responders and community partners to improve community safety. As part of Halton’s Emergency Response Plan, we conduct regular training with local municipalities to practice coordinating our response activities.  For example, in the fall of 2010 Halton Region Police, Burlington, Halton Hills, Milton and Oakville Fire Departments and Halton EMS participated in a session that simulated a plane crash involving recovery, search and rescue.These exercises are part of an ongoing effort to ensure that the Region is a disaster-resilient community, ready to deal with any potential, imminent or actual emergency. The Region’s response to the event on Sunday demonstrates that Halton is well prepared to respond to emergency situations and is committed to keeping Halton a safe place to live, work, raise a family and retire. For more information about Halton’s Emergency Management Program or to download or order Halton’s Personal Emergency Preparedness Guide, visit www.halton.ca/beprepared, dial 311 or 905-825-6000, Toll free 1-866-442-5866 or TTY 905-827-9833.  You can also follow Emergency Management on Twitter @BPreparedHalton for incident updates and preparedness tips.If you have any Regional concerns or comments you would like to share, please feel free to email me at gary.carr@halton.ca. To receive further updates on Regional issues, please subscribe to my quarterly e-newsletter, “The Carr Report.”



You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘medication log’ tag.September 20, 2012 in Emergency Care, Printables, Uncategorized | Tags: asthma, emergency, emergency care, Emergency Room, inhalor, medication log, North Hills Hospital, North Richland Hills, printable, women's health | 2 comments I don’t know about you, but in an emergency, my brain doesn’t work very well. My one and only time to have ever gone to the emergency room for myself was several years back. It was before I met my husband, so I was home alone, it was about midnight, and after several asthma attacks, each getting progressively worse, I finally decided that if I didn’t do something soon, I could be in a very dangerous situation. And so I threw on some sweat pants and drove myself to North Hills Hospital’s ER.Looking back, I should never have driven myself, but again, my brain doesn’t work very well in an emergency.Now, typically when I go to the doctor, I am prepared. I bring all of my medications (when you have asthma, there’s a lot) in a ziplock bag so that if the doctor throws me a curveball by asking me specifics about my meds, I’m ready.But when you drive yourself to the ER in the middle of the night, there’s no time to run around grabbing medications. Or anything else for that matter. You’re lucky if you remember your shoes.Which is why it’s a good idea to keep an updated medication log for each person in your family. Keep it in a handy place so that if you’re in a jam, you’ve got everything you need to take with you.And if you’re like me, you’re more motivated to keep up with it if it looks pretty.(Click here to download)And so here is my gift to you – a handy medication log that you can use for each member of your family. You’d better believe that my husband and I will have this all filled out, ready to go for the next emergency.Only this time, he’ll be the one driving me.—————————————-Bethe Wright is the Director of Marketing and Public Relations at North Hills Hospital. She has a husband, a dog, and a little yellow inhaler.Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.Join 2,001 other followers Blog at WordPress.com.Ben Eastaugh and Chris Sternal-Johnson. Subscribe to feed.





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