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Angelina Jolie: Her Oscars Makeup See 61 of This Year's

Angelina Jolie: Her Oscars Makeup See 61 of This Year's

Most people get fifth disease before they are 15 but people can get it at any age. Once your child has had a fifth disease infection, he or she won't usually get it again.Your child might not have any symptoms of fifth disease but if he or she does, they will usually appear about four to 14 days after your child is exposed to the virus, but it can be up to 20 days later.The first symptom of fifth disease is often a rash affecting the cheeks, but other symptoms before the rash appears may include:After several days a bright red rash may appear on your child’s face, particularly on the cheeks. This can make your child look flushed (and is why the condition is sometimes known as slapped-cheek syndrome). The rash will usually last for two to four days.Your child may then develop a second rash on his or her arms, which starts as a red bumpy rash and then fades to look light pink. It may spread towards the torso and down to your child’s thighs. This rash often looks like a connected pattern, which is sometimes described as lacy or net-like. It can be itchy. The rash usually lasts one to two weeks but can come back for weeks or months afterwards, for example, when your child does physical activity or if his or her skin is exposed to too much sunlight or hot water.Your child probably won’t need to see your GP if he or she has these symptoms as you can usually manage them at home. However, if your child is unwell then see your GP for advice.Fifth disease may not cause your child any further problems, but possible complications can include pain and swelling in your child’s joints. This is more common in adults, particularly women. It usually occurs in the joints in the hands, feet, ankles or knees and lasts two to four weeks, but it can last longer.Fifth disease is caused by a virus called the human parvovirus B19. This virus is spread from person to person via saliva and mucus (usually through sneezing or coughing).If you’re pregnant and have fifth disease, the virus can be passed to your foetus. The virus can also be passed on through blood transfusions or from blood products.Although it’s normally mild, your child may need to see his or her GP if their symptoms get worse as it can be confused with other conditions. Also see your GP if you’re pregnant, have a blood disorder such as thalassaemia or sickle cell anaemia, or a weakened immune system.Your child’s GP will ask about his or her symptoms and examine them. He or she may also ask you about your child’s medical history. You won’t usually need to have any tests unless you’re pregnant.If your child rests and eats a healthy, balanced diet, it may help his or her body fight the infection.It may help to apply a cold, damp sponge or cloth to your child’s skin to help relieve the discomfort of burning cheeks.If your child needs pain relief, they can take over-the-counter painkillers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen. If your child has an itchy rash, an antihistamine may help. Always read the patient information that comes with your medicine and if you have any questions, ask your pharmacist for advice.If you’re pregnant and get fifth disease, your GP may refer you to an obstetrician (a doctor who specialises in pregnancy and childbirth). You may need to be monitored and have regular ultrasound scans to make sure your baby isn’t affected by the infection. If your baby could be affected, you may need treatment. Ask your doctor for more information.Fifth disease can be more severe if you have a blood disorder such as thalassaemia or sickle cell anaemia. The virus that causes fifth disease can attack and damage red blood cells and reduce the amount of red blood cells in your body. The number of red blood cells can reduce so much that you may need a blood transfusion.People with immunodeficiency conditions, such as leukaemia and HIV/AIDS, can also be more severely affected by an infection as the virus reduces the number of blood cells in your body. You may need immunoglobulin treatment, which you will have through a drip into your vein.The fifth disease virus is in saliva and mucus secretions and you can get it when you come into close contact with a person with the condition – for example, if someone with the virus drinks from a cup that you also drink from. You can also get infected if somebody with the virus coughs or sneezes near you.You can't completely prevent a fifth disease infection, but good hygiene such as washing your hands regularly may help.If you have fifth disease, it's difficult to avoid infecting others with the virus because you’re only infectious before the rash develops. You may only realise you have fifth disease when you develop the rash by which point you may have passed the virus to others. As viruses are spread through droplets, you should always catch coughs and sneezes in a tissue, dispose of it as soon as possible and wash your hands regularly. If you have a blood disorder and have an aplastic crisis (where the fifth disease virus stops you from producing red blood cells), you will be infectious until the crisis is over.Try not to be in contact with anyone with a rash that could be infectious if you're pregnant, particularly in the first half of your pregnancy as there is an increased risk of miscarriage or harm to your baby if you get fifth disease. If you had fifth disease when you were a child, you shouldn’t be at risk because you will have developed antibodies that stay in your bloodstream and fight infections later in life. Guidance from the Health Protection Agency states that there is no need for your child to stay away from school if he or she has fifth disease.If your child gets fifth disease, you may only realise he or she has it when the rash appears. At this point, your child isn't as infectious so won't generally pass it on to other children.Tell your child's school, nursery, childminder or the parents of children your child plays with if your child gets fifth disease. Fifth disease can be more severe in children who are more vulnerable to infection, such as children who have leukaemia or are taking high doses of certain medicines that affect their immune system. It’s important to know if there is a chance they may have been infected with the virus.Pregnant women are also at an increased risk of harm to their baby if they get fifth disease. If you’re pregnant and have been near a child with fifth disease, see your GP. This is particularly important if you’re up to 20 weeks pregnant. If your child has fifth disease, try to keep him or her away from pregnant women to prevent passing on the infection.If you’re concerned you have been in contact with someone with fifth disease, see your GP. You may need to have a blood test to see if you have any antibodies to the virus that causes fifth disease. If you do have antibodies, your body will naturally fight the fifth disease infection and it shouldn't cause any problems, but if you haven't had the virus before you may need to be monitored.When you become infected with fifth disease, your body responds by making antibodies to fight the infection. If you get the infection when you’re a child, these antibodies develop and stay in your body. They fight any future fifth disease infection so you don't get the disease again. It’s possible that you may have had fifth disease as a child, but not had any symptoms, so you may be unaware that you have antibodies.If you get fifth disease when you’re older and haven't had it before, your body will produce antibodies, which will stay in your body for two to three months to fight the infection (called IgM). These antibodies are replaced with another type of antibody which will circulate in the body (IgG). These IgG antibodies stay in your body for the rest of your life and fight any future fifth disease infection.Your GP can test to see which antibodies you have in your body to find out if you have had the infection before. He or she may monitor you if you have fifth disease and haven't had the infection before.The virus is usually spread from person to person through coughing or sneezing. Half of all people who live with someone with the virus seem to get fifth disease. Only up to a third of people in less close proximity, such as teachers or day-carers exposed to children with the virus, get fifth disease.See your GP for advice if you’re pregnant and are concerned you may have fifth disease.Your child will no longer be contagious so won’t pass on the infection to others. If swimming causes the rash to become sensitive or itchy then it's best to wait for a few weeks after the rash has gone.Although your child isn’t infectious once he or she gets the rash, their skin may be sensitive and the chlorine in the water could make the rash itchy.The rash has a tendency to come back when the skin has been in hot water for a long period of time – such as in a hot bath. If you wait for a few weeks after the rash has gone before going swimming, it will help prevent the rash coming back.



Painter MommyFun stuff in the Everyday Life of a Busy Mom & EntrepreneurJuly 10, 2010 by Painter Mommy 12 Comments Can you believe it?  My children and I have Mononucleosis (other wise known as “mono” or “the kissing disease”).   The only thing I ever knew about mono was from kids in high school who had gotten it and missed like a month of school. For us, it all started back in March when my son, who was around 16 months at the time.  Once of the glands under his jaw had gotten extremely swollen and he was very cranky all the time.  We took him to the doctor to get checked out.  We even had bloodwork done, but somehow they missed the fact that it was mono – kinda frustrating.  If I knew, I would’ve done all that I could to prevent it from spreading.Well, once the summer started back in mid June, my oldest son (6) had gotten very sick with strep throat and then a few weeks later, my daughter (4) got a bad stomach flu.  She had some other odd symptoms, so I decided to take her to the doctor to see what was wrong.  They wound up doing blood work on her and it came back positive for mono.  I then took my other 2 sons to get checked as well and they came back positive for mono as well.  Over the course of these past few weeks I picked up a few things myself – first bronchitis, then the stomach flu, and now a sinus infection.  I have been very weak and tired and I really think that I have mono as well.  And the reason we are all picking up these other random sicknesses is because our immune system is already compromised because of the mono.So, I have mono and I have 3 children who have it as well.  What a summer right?  We have been stuck in the house for weeks.  Mono is highly contagious so we have not been able to do any of things that we had planned to do over the summer with our friends.I did a lot of research about mononucleosis in children and I found the same things that it says about older children or adults – there is really nothing that can be done about it than ride it out.  Mono is a viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus.  It is spread by saliva and close contact.  And how can you avoid that with small children?According to Google Health, it says that mono can cause a whole myriad of symptoms, but the main one is fatigue and a general sick feeling.  Other symptoms include:Each of my children has had different symptoms from each other so it has been interesting to watch and definitely not easy to understand.And since there is no medicine or antibiotic that will kill this sickness, the only thing they suggest is to relieve the symptoms.  These are some of the things that will help.The thing that bothers me the most is that you really don’t know how long it will last.  It can often last weeks or even months.  And it can also be contagious for that entire time as well.So, there goes our summer!  Another crazy trial we have to face…The thing that I am grateful for though, is that even though we cannot really be around other children right now – my children are able to be with each other and entertain themselves.  I am so blessed to have 4 children and even though when sickness comes in our home, it is definitely harder to deal with… I would not want to trade my family for anything in the world.So, how about you?  Have you ever had to deal with mono?  What symptoms did you have?  How long did it last?  I would love to heard from you.Filed Under: Health Tagged With: adult with mono, child with mono, mono, mono in children, mono symptoms, mononucleosis, mononucleosis in adults Teresha@ Marlie and Me says July 11, 2010 at 6:32 amTwitter: Mommy2MarlieI feel so bad for you and your little ones! Get well soon. Teresha@ Marlie and Me´s last blog post ..Baby Log- Week 46[Reply] Kellyn says July 11, 2010 at 7:46 amI have had Mono TWICE…very rare from what the doctor said back then. It was not fun when I was 11 or when I was 16. I was exhausted, sore and my stomach hurt both times. I was home the first time for almost a month, and the second for just over a month then going back to school for half days for three weeks then full time with no gym because of the swolleen spleen. I hope you ALL feel better so SO soon! It is not fun when your kids have it, but add you to the mix and that is just awful! Kellyn´s last blog post ..Randomness[Reply]admin Reply:July 12th, 2010 at 7:47 amI have actually heard that mono can stay in your system for years and that it can actually re-occur just like Lyme disease. But yeah, you are right – definitely not easy when all of us have it.I do appreciate you taking the time to comment and I hope you are having a great summer!Dawn[Reply] mom says July 11, 2010 at 9:26 amMy poor babies!Especially my big baby that has to care for my other babies while she’s sick! 🙁 🙁 boohoo[Reply]admin Reply:July 12th, 2010 at 7:45 amThanks mom![Reply] Connie Arnold says July 11, 2010 at 10:04 amHow sad that you all are sick and missing out on all the fun of summer! Sure hope it won’t linger too long and you will all be back to good health as soon as possible![Reply]admin Reply:July 12th, 2010 at 7:45 amThanks so much Connie. I appreciate your comment. I am sure we will be better soon. DAWN[Reply] Michelle` says July 12, 2010 at 7:59 amI had it about 10 years ago. It was HORRIBLE. I thought I just had the flu so I ignored it until it was so bad that it infected my liver & enlarged it. i was hospitalized for a week & then bed ridden for the entire summer. It was horrible. I never quite got my energy level back but it looks like you caught it in time & are taking the right steps to help everyone get over it. Hang in there – this will pass![Reply]admin Reply:July 12th, 2010 at 1:20 pmOh my goodness. Wow! I am so sorry to hear that you had such a hard time with mono. Wow! I sure hope that we caught it in time. It scares me reading about people relapsing and dealing with the sickness for months and even years as you did. Scary stuff. Thanks for taking the time to comment. I always appreciate the support from my readers. God bless!DAWN[Reply] Leslie @LaMamaNaturale says July 20, 2010 at 8:26 pmOMGoodness, girlie! I’m so sorry to hear about your dealings with mono. What a tough illness to deal with. Hang in there, mama! You’re such a strong woman. I had no idea mono was such a big deal. Hope you all get well soon!! Leslie @LaMamaNaturale´s last blog post ..yesterday’s dinner- choice![Reply] MommyGeekology says July 23, 2010 at 6:49 amThat is simply FULL of suck. are you all feeling better? MommyGeekology´s last blog post ..Dress Up Ask the Readers[Reply]Painter Mommy Reply:July 25th, 2010 at 5:10 amWe are feeling soooooo much better now. Thanks so much for asking![Reply]Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Website Online Coupons Top Brands All Posters Coupons Spencers Gifts Coupons Office Depot Coupons GameStop Coupons Newegg Discount Codes var sn_a = '1872'; var sn_a = '1872';





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