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Parenting Tips Archives — Page 2 of 6 — MediMetry

Parenting Tips Archives — Page 2 of 6 — MediMetry

Send us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"This is a picture of my son Cason, right around 8 or 9 months of age, enjoying some Cheetos. He is now almost 4 years old and the light of our lives! He changed the way we view the world (for the better, of course!) as well as how we live our lives. Cason means the world to us and we couldn't feel more blessed to be his parents." --Peggy, mom Send us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"Alex is an amazing little guy with so many abilities. We found out about his diagnosis when I was about 20 weeks pregnant. We would not change a thing." --Andrea, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"This is my beautiful baby girl Madee. Thanks for posting all the pictures of these little blessings! They bring pure joy to the world!" --Randi, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome GalleriesSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome GalleriesSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome GalleriesSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"Caleb is such a blessing to our family and the absolute joy of our lives. He is surprising us at every turn - first, with his diagnosis at birth, but lately by walking all over, learning new signs (more than 40 total now), and saying "uh-oh" after he throws his dinner on the floor. He wakes up smiling and goes to bed smiling. We couldn't have asked for a better kid." --Robin, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome GalleriesSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome GalleriesSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"Our son Dorsey was born 9 weeks early and has Down Syndrome. He is an inspiration to us and although we haven't been able to bring him home yet we look forward to each and every day we spend together." --Stacy, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"Here is a picture of our beautiful little girl!" --Stacy, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"We hope you find him as wonderfully adorable as we do! Thank you for celebrating Down Syndrome." --Dana, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"Hannah has been such a blessing in our lives. She has truly touched the lives of so many people and has shown that everyone is unique in their own way. Hannah is our first born and we have never been more grateful to have her in our lives. She is truly an amazing gift that has been given to us. We thank the Lord every day for blessing us with such a beautiful daughter!" --Marisha, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome GalleriesSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"I am the proud mom of Lucy Kay, who was born with Down Syndrome. She is our youngest child and a joy to everyone she meets. She attends regular preschool, takes ballet and loves to play with her brother and sister. To know her is definitely to love her!" --Jill, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"Here is a photo of my daughter, Chloe, in the trick or treat candy bowl! She just turned 9 months old and is doing so well after a rough start. She is the best thing that could have ever happened to my family!" --Michelle, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome GalleriesSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"Here is one of my favorite photos of my precious gift, Brianna, who happens to have Down Syndrome. Thank you for sharing our Joy with the world!" --Sherilyn, momSend us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries"We are pleased to introduce to you / Anna Kathleen. / She surprised us three weeks early / On April 15.A good and perfect gift from / God up above, / We welcome her into our lives with / Much joy and endless love.Fearfully and wonderfully made / By our God in heaven, / Instead of 46 chromosomes, / He gave her 47.Known as Downs Syndrome, / Or Trisomy 21, / The blessings Anna will bring us / Have only just begun. We share this news with you / Not out of sadness or despair, / But so you will know, and so you can pray, / And because we know you care.Anna, though special, is like any / Little girl / Just needing a little extra help / To make it in this world.We are tickled pink to have Anna, / And can't wait to watch her grow. / We will watch with amazement at / The Places She Will Go!" --Lori, mom Send us a photo of your baby with Down Syndrome!A Special Joy: Babies With Down Syndrome Galleries



Why is sex education so important? Because it’s important for your kids to know about sex before they do something stupid? No. Because it’s important for you to hear about sex from you. The minute children enter their tweens, they’re suddenly exposed to many little bits of distorted information that can become confusing, and frankly, frightening. There’s a need to prepare them for what is to come right from the beginning of their lives. The trick is to know exactly how much to impart at what stage. So take a look at Cath Hakanson’s article from Hey Sigmund. She gives you a very detailed breakdown about how you should treat sex education at each age range:The names of their body parts- yes, the penis and vulva too!That it is okay to touch all parts of their body – let them grab their vulva or penis at bath time or during nappy changes.Start pointing out the differences between boys and girls – boys have penises and girls have vulvas.Start talking about the functions of our body parts – urine comes out through your penis/vulva, poo comes out through your bottom/ (and it is okay to use appropriate slang, just not all of the time).If they like being naked all the time, start introducing boundaries about nudity – there is a time and a place to be naked (and it isn’t at the park!).Technically, it isn’t really sex education at this age. It is really just about letting your child explore their whole body and to start pointing out simple differences between boys and girls. When naming the parts of their bodies you can also include their penis or vulva and also talk about what they can do – ‘yes, that is your penis and your wee (urine) comes out of there!’. The end goal is for your child to be comfortable with their whole body and to see all parts as being equal (with no shame).The correct names of the body parts and what they do.That boys and girls are different but are also the same – girls have a vulva, boys have a penis but we all have nipples/bottoms/noses/hands, etc.That our bodies are different and that is okay to be different.That our bodies can tell us what we are feeling – we have many different feelings and we can feel them in our body.That some parts of the body are private -these aren’t for the whole world to see.That there are private and public places and times – this one is a tricky one for kids to learn as it changes. For example, it might be okay for your child to be naked at home when their grandmother is visiting but not the plumber!To respect other people’s privacy. For example, if the bathroom door is closed, that they should knock and ask if they can come in.That they are entitled to privacy too – like when they go to the toilet, are in the bath or getting dressed.That conversations about bodies are for private times at home and with their parents (not in the school yard).That it is okay to touch their penis or vulva but that there is a time and a place for it.Set limits around genital play. Explain that touching your own genitals can feel good but that it is a private activity, like toileting, and it should happen in a private place, like in their bedroom.If your child grabs their genitals when they are out socially, gently remind them that they need to keep their hands out of their pants. Don’t make a big fuss as they are doing it because it makes them feel more secure. Eventually they will outgrow it!If found playing ‘doctor’ with a friend (looking at each other’s genitals), take a deep breath, calmly interrupt them, ask them to get dressed and distract them into another toy or game. Later on, you can discuss privacy and rules about touching.That all living things reproduce- trees drop seeds, dogs have puppies and humans have babies. Slowly start pointing out examples of reproduction when you see it.A baby grows inside the woman – uterus or baby bag or even tummy (you’ll get specific later on).Both a man and a woman are needed to make a baby.How a baby is made – that you need a part from a man (cell or sperm) and a part from a woman (cell or egg) to make a baby. ‘Where do I come from’ is usually the first question kids ask!That a baby grows inside a woman. Keep it super simple – they only want basic concepts. The details come much later.If they want to know how the baby comes out, just explain that it comes out of the woman’s stomach or through her vagina.That making babies is for adults and not for kids to do. Get into the habit of reminding them of this, every time you talk about it.That they are the boss of their body and have a right to say who can touch their body (you included).That it is not okay to hug or touch someone if they don’t want you to (and vice versa).That sometimes there are reasons for an adult to look at or touch their body, like a doctor or nurse.That we don’t keep secrets about our bodies. Secrets can be about surprises and presents.That they can always tell you about anything that makes them feel bad or funny.Preschoolers are the easiest age to teach. They are like empty sponges, ready to soak up information about anything and everything. If they haven’t had an explanation that makes sense to them, they will use their imagination to make up their own reason. Get ready to repeat yourself as they easily forget and sometimes they don’t understand you the first time or only hear part of it. And don’t forget to ask them what they mean, so that you give them the right answer!You want to set yourself as their number one source for information. This means being honest and answering their questions about babies. By answering, you are giving your child the message that they can talk to you about anything and that you are a reliable source for information. This is a good thing, especially once they start to have contact with other kids.If you are struggling with the words to use, there are some fantastic sex education books that you can use. They provide the information and are written in an age-appropriate way. Also, at this age, they don’t notice if you slip an educational book into the pile of books that you read before bed each night!Know what words to use when talking about body parts (both boys and girls) – penis, testicles, scrotum, , vulva, labia, vagina, clitoris, uterus and ovaries.To have some knowledge of the internal reproductive organs – uterus, ovary, fallopian tubes, urethra, bladder, bowel.That bodies come in all different shapes, sizes and colours.Both boys and girls have body parts that feel good when touched.To be able to look after their own body i.e. private parts, hair, teeth, skin, etc.To have refusal skills in place – ‘Stop, I don’t like that’.That their bodies will change as they get older.That puberty is a time of physical and emotional change. If they want to know what changes, just talk about how this is the stage where they grow into an adult.That a baby can happen when a man’s sperm joins a woman’s ovum and that it usually happens by sexual intercourse (IVF is another way).That a baby is made when sperm leave the man through his penis and go into the woman’s vagina. They then find their way to the place where the egg is. The egg and the sperm then join together, and grow into a baby.That adults have sex and that it’s a natural, normal and healthy part of life.That adults often kiss, hug, touch and engage in other sexual behaviours with one another to show caring for each other and to feel good.That sex is an adult activity and is not for kids.That adults can choose whether or not to have a baby.Masturbation – some kids do and some don’t.That all sexual behaviour is private i.e. masturbation, sexual intercourse.That bodies can feel good when touched.That sometimes people look at pictures of naked people or people having sex on the internet and this is not for kids. You also need to discuss with your child what they should do when (not if) they come across these images.Explain that there are different sexual orientations such as heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual.Love means having deep and warm feelings for yourself and others.People can experience different types of love.People express love in different ways to their parents, families and friends.Dating is when two people are romantically attracted to each other and spend their free time together.Dating starts as a teen.People can experience different loving relationships throughout their lives.You can have many friends or just a few.You can have different types of friends.Friends can be angry with each other and still be friends.Friends spend time together and get to know each other.Friends can hurt each other’s feelings.Friendships depend on honesty.Friends can be older or younger, male or female.There are different types of families.Families can change over time.Every member has something unique to contribute.Family members take care of each other.Families have rules to help them live together.Members of a family can live in different places and still be a family.Everyone has rights, kids too.People communicate in many different ways.It is okay to ask for help.Start practicing decision making around the home.All decisions have consequences – positive and negative.Practice assertiveness.Practice negotiation skills to resolve a problem or conflict.This is the stage where your kids believe and absorb everything you say – so don’t waste this opportunity to set yourself up as their main source for information. If you don’t they will just get it from somewhere else (friends and the media).There is a big difference between what a 5-year-old and an 8-year-old needs to know – as they get older, you need to give them more details and repeat yourself a lot more!Try to answer their questions as honestly and matter-of-factly as possible. Ask them ‘what do you think?’ – this helps you to work out what they already know and what they want to know. Make sure that you give them enough information so that they don’t make wrong conclusions, e.g. if you say that a baby is made when a man and woman sleep together, they may think that means when they lie down next to each other. Check that they have understood what you have said and to see if they have any more questions.Some kids don’t ask questions, which means that it is up to you to start the conversation. You can do this by looking for everyday opportunities to start a conversation – a pregnant woman, a couple kissing on TV, menstrual products in the bathroom. You could also buy some sex education books to read together.All of the above but in much greater detailWhat physical, social and emotional changes to expect with puberty (both sexes).Girls need to know be prepared for their first period.Boys need to know about ejaculation and wet dreams.That fertility happens once girls start having periods and boys start producing semen.That both boys and girls are able to have babies after they have reached puberty.More details about sexual intercourse and other sexual behaviours.Basic information about STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections) and how to prevent them through safe sex (condoms).Basic information about how to avoid pregnancy (condoms, delaying sexual intercourse).Awareness of their parent’s sexual values and beliefs – love, dating, contraception, when it is okay to become sexually active, etc.That they will start to feel more sexual and develop romantic feelings towards their peers. Sexual intercourse is not typical at this age, it is more likely to be kissing and hugging.That same sex fantasy and attraction is not unusual and does not necessarily indicate sexual orientation.That sexuality is exaggerated in pornography.How to be cybersmart and to use their mobile phone safely.The characteristics of respectful relationships.This may be your last chance to talk while your child is still willing to listen to you! As they approach their teens, they are starting to rely more on their friends for answers and information. This means that you need to make sure they know that they can come and talk to you about anything (and I mean anything).So answer their questions honestly and provide them with more detailed information. If you don’t know the answer to their question, look for the answer together. Don’t just tell them the facts but share what your values and beliefs are about it, especially when it comes to topics such as love, dating, sexual intercourse and contraception.You’ll need to start getting creative and find some new ways to start talking with them (give them a book, talk whilst driving them somewhere, talk about something you both see while watching TV. You can also help them to develop decision-making, communication and assertiveness skills.If you haven’t started talking to your kids about sex by this stage, you had better get moving! It is never too late to start, but it will be a lot more challenging!Adolescence is when sex education really starts to get sexual! There’s a lot of tough topics out there – dating, contraception, when to have sex, how to say ‘no’, to name a few!The huge benefit of talking to your kids from an early age is that you have empowered them with the knowledge to be able to make good decisions about sex. You will also have a relationship with them where they know that they can talk to you about anything – and I mean anything!The information that you have given your child is important, but what really matters is that you are talking about it! That is what really matters!(And remember, it is never too late to start talking!)ChatsShare Your Concerns With Other MomsWeight TrackerCheck if your Child is Growing WellInterests SelectorCreate Your Own Personal FeedSign UpReceive Our Weekly Guides & Newsletters By EmailAre You A ParentHere's Your Step-by-step guide Twinkle Khanna - "The Devil could not be everywhere so he created mothers-in-law" 5 belly blasting breakfast tips by Rujuta Diwekar! Breastfeeding moms, these silly mistakes can be dangerous! Are you breastfeeding your baby to sleep? You may want to read this! Had unprotected sex? Run to your kitchen right now! Here’s why Are you doing more harm to your baby than you realise? 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