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The Kingdom, The Kids, & The Cowboys » Blog Archive » True

The Kingdom, The Kids, & The Cowboys » Blog Archive » True

TEFL Educator / TEFL Boot CampTraining for Teaching English as a Foreign Language1. Play the video below to start this lesson. . . Please wait a few seconds for the video to load2 .We have created a podcast to complement this lesson.Click on the link to play it here: Discipline in the EFL ClassroomYou can download all our podcasts from our podcast page.3. Basic ConceptsThe best way to deal with student discipline in the EFL classroom is to have a good lesson plan that is active and encourages the participation of every student in the room. An active student is not usually a problem student.That said, many students are not in the EFL classroom because they want to be. Many are there because their school or university program requires it, their employer requires it or their parents put them in the class. A few parents even use language schools as a babysitting service. So, sometimes, problems can be expected.No matter what the problem, the best policy is to keep your cool. In fact, the best advice is to always act on a problem BEFORE you get upset while you can still think rationally and calmly about solving it. Plan ahead for dealing with common problems.Set clear rules and explain them to students the first day of class. Be serious about the rules and enforce them consistently, without showing any upset and you are on your way.Students who talk a lot or misbehave in a mild manner can often be quieted just by your presence if you stand next to them. Even quite disruptive teenagers can often be settled down with a simple gentle hand placed on their shoulder. You don't have to say anything; they get the message. Try not to take things too seriously. Just enforce rules with a smile on your face so as to not upset the rest of the class. Adults generally are not too problematic though in some cultures they can be.Children present a special challenge. Remember the old rule that the length of an activity for a child should be no longer than double their age minus two and some suggest age equals length of activity. Thus a four-year-old child can probably only tolerate an activity of six minutes or less and then you should move on.Children will often act out for your attention and it would be best to study some basic psychology and behavior modification techniques to keep a handle on them. Generally speaking, giving a child attention for unwanted behavior is not a good idea. It is far better to target the child right next to the misbehaving child and reward them for doing what you want the problem child to do (like sitting down or working on the assigned task).It is important to get some idea from your employer what rules they feel should be enforced and what they recommend you do about discipline problems. Language schools are typically private businesses and need you to deal with any problems gently, positively and in a way that doesn't chase their customers away. Ask the other teachers what the school enforces and if they "back up" their teachers. Some don't and it is better to know that before you have to press a point and lose.Know that what might be perceived as "cheating" in the Western world might be considered "helping your friends" in some other cultures. Here, prevention is the best action. Move desks far apart and even all the way up to the front and back walls during examinations. Don't allow cheating but don't get too stressed by it. It is sometimes a cultural issue more than anything else.Discipline in the EFL classroom is no different than discipline in any other type of classroom with the simple exception that you have one more thing to frustrate your students and that is language.The enjoyable video below provides ten important points for classroom management The following video is longer and more detailed, but she has some great ideas too. Try to find a compromise between her details and the first videos more relaxed approach. They are both great! 4. Expanded ConceptsRead the following link for excellent advice, information and help with discipline issues in the classroom.Top 10 Tips for Successful Classroom Discipline - read this page and peruse the links as well -That should give you a good start and get you thinking about positive discipline and motivation.



Classroom 2.0Listening well—actively and deeply—is a skill that requires both attention and intention. It starts with our ears (making sense of words as well as the speaker’s tone) but also involves our eyes (body language says a lot). In a world increasingly cluttered with information, getting students to listen mindfully is a challenge. Julian Treasure suggests in a TED Talk that we are actually “losing our listening.” Teaching students to listen better will help them to succeed in your classes, as well as to engage more deeply with the world.When you want your students to explore a specific topic or question, here’s a small group strategy to use that encourages active listening (along with offering all the advantages of collaborative learning).Before starting this activity, review the following guidelines with your students:First, you must listen with openness: suspend your judgments and biases and listen for those things with which you agree as well as those you might challenge.Second, listen with curiosity: engage your desire to learn and understand, rather than to try to fix anything or simply offer your own point of view.Third, listen respectfully: listen without asking questions that interrupt the speaker; jot these down and save them for later.Fourth, listen schematically: listen for patterns, trends, and for what is not being said.Fifth, listen intentionally: decide what you intend to do with the information you’ll learn.There are only two rules:Step One: Break the students into small groups of four or five.Step Two: Give them the topic or question that you would like them to discuss.Step Three: Each group should identify or appoint a group leader who will make sure the rules are followed and time is observed.Step Four: One person begins by saying something about the topic or starting point question; the others listen using the guidelines noted above.Step Five: Another student asks a follow-up question or comments about what has just been said.Step Six: Repeat Steps Four and Five until everyone has spoken at least twice, or for a specific amount of time.Step Seven: The group leader, with help from the group, summarizes the conversation and identifies any patterns or insights that emerged or developed.Step Eight: Report out to the class.You could follow this activity with a reflective journal entry, asking students what surprised them (it may be the difficulty of listening actively) and what new or interesting points/ideas they learned.The first few times you try this, you may need to float around the room, encouraging students to stay on task. Once they get the hang of it, you’ll find this activity combines active listening, active learning, collaborative learning, and writing, all strategies that help students to probe and reflect on their own learning.Additional Resources:Artze-Vega, Isis. “Active Listening: Seven Ways to Help Students Listen, Not Just Hear.” Faculty Focus: Higher Ed Teaching Strategies from Magna Publications. 10/1/2012. http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/active-l...Mankell, Henning. “The Art of Listening.” The New York Times. Opinion. 12.10.2011. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/11/opinion/sunday/in-africa-the-art-...Thanks to Lisa Dresdner, Ph.D., Norwalk Community College, and to Dr. Judith Ableser, director of the Oakland University Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, for this tip. Tags: Share !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs"); Tweet Facebook Views: 1554 ▶ Reply to This That's was really a humorous one. We all as a teacher have to keep on pinging students as "Do You All Hear Me Now?" and they are always like the same.The idea of breaking students into groups ia what I usually do in my classroom. Thanks for all those tips. Making someone to report to you directly among those small groups is the best way to make sure that everyone takes care of their respective groups. ▶ Reply Thanks, Oscar. I always appreciate your comments! ▶ Reply Most of the time teachers walk into the classroom with the expectation they need to be authoritative to get students to listen. But, quite often, what teachers fail to understand is that they need to spend less time "performing" and spend more time "interacting." If you want to appeal to students more effectively and be able to take control of classroom management problems, then you need to listen to them carefully and understand them.   ▶ Reply I'm currently attending college to receive my teaching degree. The course I am currently taking is classroom management. I could definitely see an activity like this being an asset for pre-service teachers, learning about classroom behavior management and making themselves better students. Thanks for the tips. ▶ Reply Absolutely, Alicia. Glad you found it helpful. I wish you the best as you pursue your degree! ▶ Reply RSS Welcome toClassroom 2.0Sign Upor Sign InOr sign in with:Global Leadership Week | April 24 - 28, 2017Library 2.017 - Digital Literacy & Fake News | June 1st, 2017ISTE unplugged | June 24 - 28, 2017Library 2.017 - Makerspaces | October 11, 2017Get Badge © 2017   Created by Steve Hargadon.   Powered by Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service Please check your browser settings or contact your system administrator.





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