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University & School Entrance Interview Course HKEnglish

University & School Entrance Interview Course HKEnglish

In Charleston, SC, USA students became teachers through an innovative public health awareness program. Last year the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium (AHEC) partnered with the US National Library of Medicine and three high schools for a health information literacy project. The high school students were charged with researching public health themes and creating educational comic books geared toward middle school students. They worked with directly health professionals, learned about resources from the National Library of Medicine, and overall improved their health literacy all while creating great comics!An important part of the Health Literacy Program is for high school students to display their knowledge and understanding by creating teaching tools geared toward middle school students. The AHEC program office, having used Comic Life for some of their own educational programs felt that Comic Life would be a great fit – giving the high school students a tool they could quickly learn and ultimately use to create professional looking products.Dr. D. Carson, Assistant Director“The creation of public health themed comics made sense as a dynamic and creative service-learning opportunity for high school students… their efforts created enduring, entertaining, multimedia resources for younger students to learn more about public health issues,” said Associate Program Director for Education, Dr. Deborah Stier Carson. During the school year, the students attended workshops at the South Carolina AHEC Program Office where they learned valuable interviewing techniques and story writing skills, as well as tricks of the trade for good design and production. The students also became more proficient in determining the credibility of health information found on the Internet.  During the research phase of the project students took advantage of the story boarding template built into Comic Life 3, preparing them for what questions to ask and what photos to take while on their interview field trips. Prior to the creating their final storylines, the students interviewed healthcare professionals, public safety and emergency response personnel and other relevant experts to gather first-hand insight into their topic areas.Each team had distinct managing roles assigned to the students: Project Manager, Research Manager, Creative Manager, Software Supervisor and, in some cases, Artist. The SC AHEC office provided students with the main characters (Vanessa, Brian and Rx), but some schools chose to add their own drawn characters too! Using the Instant Alpha tool built into Comic Life 3 they were easily able to layer photos and drawings to build scenes. We even had a chance to work with the schools at one of the workshops, showing students some of the advanced features in the app. The students were quickly able to navigate the app and layout their comics, leaving more time for sorting out which interview photos and quotes to use.At the end of the year select students from each school travelled to Washington, DC and present their research and comics in front of the National Library of Medicine!   The pilot program was such a success that they’ll be working on another round of comics this year! Learn more about the health literacy program on the SC AHEC project website. 



Samkit Sethia is a graduate of 2015 Batch of NUJS, Kolkata. He has had an exemplary timeline with the publications of seven papers, completing from twelve internships and has held a series of designations at WBNUJS. He has been chosen to work as an Associate at Trilegal, New Delhi.In this interview we talk about: I went to a boarding school and thus, I remember always enjoying being challenged and sustaining my diverse interests. Learning outside the classroom interested me more and being an avid reader, writer and debater—I felt it was important to think in terms of arguments and develop an individual standpoint. This avenue of growth is what propelled me to pursue law. I will be the first lawyer in my family. I come from a family where everyone is ultimately expected to join and contribute to the family business; this determinacy also fed into my interest for choosing a career that allows me to be creative with it. Being extremely busy works for me and that is how I managed my time in college.I kept myself extremely busy throughout most of law school. I was part of many societies and committees at NUJS and that kept me occupied for the most part. In addition, time permitting I interned during the semesters (online research work) and wrote a few papers.I didn’t compromise on having my share of fun in college; just like everyone else, I always found time for that. The most important thing is that it was always a community interacting with the larger community, it could never be just about the individual—which is something I learnt over the years through our experiences in various college societies and committees. Everyone brings so much to the table that it always a wonderful learning experience. You learn to appreciate different perspectives and different types of intelligence as well.Specifically speaking academic societies allowed me to develop and further my interests in niche areas of law and allowed me to work on something which I enjoyed outside of the stipulated college curriculum.Being Coordinator of the Recruitment Committee gave me a different kind of exposure; pursuing recruiters, handling administrative tasks and an overall HR lesson.  It was a great learning experience and while it took up an awful lot of time, I’d definitely do it all over again. I’d say working on the paper on the Problems, Pitfalls and Perspectives on Public Interest Litigation in India because I was just not collating information on the paper but constantly bearing in mind the comparative angle vis-a-vis China. This paper was written while I was interning with the Danish Institute of Human Rights and the Legal Aid Society of West Bengal as part of a Study Tour comprising Chinese lawyers who were visiting to yse how PILs function in India. This forced me to broaden my approach, yet remain nuanced in my reading of the Indian situation. Broadly, quality comes from grounded research, your own input and a cogent argument. The most significant for me is relevance for often it turns out that it is easy to get published in specialised areas or spin off a paper on a pivot that you think is “fresh” or “new”, but the real challenge is being able to do that while remaining socially relevant, accessible and cogent. Especially so at the university level when your engagement with the world outside and the discipline is unfettered—which is not the case when you are professionally placed and have demands of work wearing you down. I think the “professional” nature the degree has acquired given the higher education scenario in India is detrimental to a spontaneous engagement with the subject. I have seen my college mates blindly following the herd when it comes to setting out a fixed plan of internships to do and the kind of brownie points to collect for your CV. While being practical about gaining experience is important, it is also important to indulge yourself by doing whatever interests you so that you can make an informed decision about what you’re suited best to do once you graduate. I enjoy being busy so this is the kind of schedule that worked best for me. Some of my close friends chose to focus on just a few gruelling internships, or academics and so on. It is all about taking the first couple of years to figure out a rhythm that works best for you. For example, I interned every break but also chose virtual internships during the semesters when my coursework and other activities weren’t too many. I found it to be a valuable experience because I realized that while reading, researching and prepping for the moots, I learnt an enormous deal about specific areas of law that gets elided in class. Further, while speaking in public in a competitive scenario, it demands you to be thorough, coherent and articulate—seminal skills of a good lawyer! Paper publications because the curriculum and assessment pattern rarely allows one such creativity and individuation of ideas. Both have their advantages in their own right, but paper publications helped me have a better understanding of the topics I researched as opposed to moots. Brevity and cogency are important skills to me because they stand for a thorough research base and an effortless command over the subject matter. This in turn helps make the argument more convincing.In a flashback, what are they benchmark achievements did law school have to offer you?Law school allowed me to nurture friendships, write papers, moot, enjoy most of my weekends, land a job, learn law, intern, travel and otherwise have a fantastic college life. I couldn’t have asked for more! Keep reading Superlawyer!Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Website iPleaders  and  VakilSearchpresentsThe Legal Practice Management CourseTools and tactics to change your life and businessCopyright © 2016 Intelligent Legal Risk Management Solutions LLP. Site by Donnie Ashok





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