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NEW Berlin Childhood Around 1900 by Walter Benjamin

NEW Berlin Childhood Around 1900 by Walter Benjamin

in Books | May 3rd, 2016 3 CommentsIf you're in Berlin, stop by the Galerie Max Hetzler, which is currently staging an exhibition where the Jewish mystic philosopher Walter Benjamin plays a prominent role. Here's how the gallery sets the scene:[British artist British artist Edmund] De Waal first came to know the city of Berlin through the writings of Walter Benjamin, particularly his autobiographical fragments in A Berlin Childhood around 1900. The exhibition title, Irrkunst, has been taken from Benjamin’s concept of the art of getting lost, the art of noticing what has been disregarded.In the Bleibtreustrasse gallery, offering a room with a view on Walter Benjamin's former school, [De Waal] will show works that reflect Benjamin's childhood, his passion for gathering objects and the idea of collecting as memory work. Here, amongst others, de Waal will present a major new series of vitrines. Furthermore, a selection of original notes and mcripts from the Walter Benjamin archive in Berlin will be on view at Bleibtreustrasse and illustrate Benjamin's own way of working as well as de Waal's deep fascination with the œuvre of this thinker.One such item on display, we discovered through Julia Michalska's Twitter stream, is "Walter Benjamin's notebook in which he noted all the books he read since he was 18"--a picture of which you can find above. When I zoomed into the image, I couldn't make out the books on the list. But I did get this detail: By 1931/32, the 40-year-old Benjamin had amassed 1200 books on his list, which means he was reading, on average, 54 books per year. No doubt, they weren't light ones. If anyone stops by Galerie Max Hetzler and identifies actual titles in the notebook, we'd love it if you could note some in the comments section below.Update: Some titles were added to the comments below--books by Cocteau, Hemingway, Malraux and more. Check them out.Looking for free, professionally-read audio books from Audible.com? Here’s a great, no-strings-attached deal. If you start a 30 day free trial with Audible.com, you can download two free audio books of your choice. Get more details on the offer here. Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. If you'd like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us provide the best free cultural and educational materials.Related Content:Walter Benjamin’s 13 Oracular Writing TipsWalter Benjamin’s Radio Plays for Kids (1929-1932)Walter Benjamin’s Philosophical Thought Presented by Two Experimental Films by Dan Colman | Permalink | Comments (3) | google_ad_client = "ca-pub-1184791463292965"; google_ad_slot = "6862917067"; google_ad_width = 300; google_ad_height = 600; 1155) Martin Beradt: Der deutsche Richter 1154) EC Bentley: Der Sprung durchs Fenster 1155) Klaus Mann: Geschwister 1156) Lion Feuchtwanger: Erfolg 1157) Shakespeare: Timon von Athen 1158) Lichtenberg: Timorus oder Verteidigung zweier Juden 1159) Hemingway: In einem andern Land 1160) L. Carroll: Alice im Wunderland 1161) Ernst Bloch: Spuren 1162) Hofmannsthal: Fragmente eines Romans 1163) Otto Roeld: Malenski auf der Tour 1164) E. Podach: Nietzsches Zusammenbruch 1165) Mac Orlan: Alkoholschmuggler 1166) Karl Korsch: Marxismus und Philosophie 1167) Thomas Mann: Deutsche Ansprache 1168) Malraux: Les conquérants 1169) Mansfield Scott: Der schwarze Kreis 1170) Johannes von Günther: Cagliostro 1171) Friedrich Kroner: Der Kreisel 1172) Marcel Jouhandeau: Ximenès Manlinjoude 1173) Wilhelm Speyer: Die goldne Horde 1174) Jean Cocteau: La voix humaine 1175) Hughes: Ein Sturmwind auf Jamaika 1176) Anthony Berkeley: Der Detektivklub 1177) Polgar: Die Defraudanten 1178) Das Problem des Klassischen und die Antike 1179) L’affaire Redureau Documents réunis par André Gide 1180) Matjew Roesmann: Fischbein streckt die WaffenFrom 18 to 40 is 22 years, so 100 books a year would be 2200 books and not 1200. Thank God,he read in a more human pace !!A (near complete) list can be found here:https://books.google.com/books?id=GtNpBwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=falseName (required) Email (required) Message Click here to cancel reply. (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Get the best cultural and educational resources on the web curated for you in a daily email. We never spam. Unsubscribe at any time. FOLLOW ON SOCIAL MEDIAOpen Culture editor Dan Colman scours the web for the best educational media. He finds the free courses and audio books you need, the language lessons & movies you want, and plenty of enlightenment in between.©2006-2017 Open Culture, LLC. All rights reserved.if you like our Facebook fanpage, you'll receive more articles like the one you just read!



Posted in: Trips & TravelersIn Berlin Childhood around 1900, the philosopher Walter Benjamin posited that to really know a city, it’s necessary to get lost in it. To the letter, he wrote in one fragment:Not to find one’s way around a city does not mean much. But to lose one’s way in a city, as one loses one’s way in a forest, requires some schooling.Benjamin belonged to a time when there was no GPS and perhaps not even tourist maps. Still less were the contemporary obsessions with knowing everything and always being prepared: the best times to visit this or that museum, whether or not it will rain in the summer, or if there’s Uber in a given city, and so on.Instead, Benjamin believed in vagrancy and spontaneity. He trusted in surprise (though that sounds paradoxical) and he knew that frequently, knowledge and experience arise with the unexpected.We remember Benjamin, but we could speak of a tradition of travel offset by the arrival of tourism. The traveler was someone heroic and adventurous, a risk taker, and that’s why the contrast is so sharp with the tourists who plan carefully, who know where to go, what to see, and where to eat.Cuban poet, Jose Lezama Lima, said in an interview that “the journey is to recognize, and to recognize oneself.” And it’s possible that in these two thoughts there is a kind of spiritual brotherhood. The trip is a spatial movement, it’s real, but it’s also symbolic. We move from one place to another but also from one emotional state to another, and from one way of thinking to another. We discover things, our horizons widen, we realize that something that we had believed was true is, perhaps, not so.Why not travel then with a bit of that spirit? Why not exchange a bit of immediacy for the tourist’s desire to control, to get the traveler’s amazement and the unexpected?The question is perhaps even more elemental. Are you willing to travel this way, based on the premise that you need to lose yourself in order to find yourself?.In Berlin Childhood around 1900, the philosopher Walter Benjamin posited that to really know a city, it’s necessary to get lost in it. To the letter, he wrote in one fragment:Not to find one’s way around a city does not mean much. But to lose one’s way in a city, as one loses one’s way in a forest, requires some schooling.Benjamin belonged to a time when there was no GPS and perhaps not even tourist maps. Still less were the contemporary obsessions with knowing everything and always being prepared: the best times to visit this or that museum, whether or not it will rain in the summer, or if there’s Uber in a given city, and so on.Instead, Benjamin believed in vagrancy and spontaneity. He trusted in surprise (though that sounds paradoxical) and he knew that frequently, knowledge and experience arise with the unexpected.We remember Benjamin, but we could speak of a tradition of travel offset by the arrival of tourism. The traveler was someone heroic and adventurous, a risk taker, and that’s why the contrast is so sharp with the tourists who plan carefully, who know where to go, what to see, and where to eat.Cuban poet, Jose Lezama Lima, said in an interview that “the journey is to recognize, and to recognize oneself.” And it’s possible that in these two thoughts there is a kind of spiritual brotherhood. The trip is a spatial movement, it’s real, but it’s also symbolic. We move from one place to another but also from one emotional state to another, and from one way of thinking to another. We discover things, our horizons widen, we realize that something that we had believed was true is, perhaps, not so.Why not travel then with a bit of that spirit? Why not exchange a bit of immediacy for the tourist’s desire to control, to get the traveler’s amazement and the unexpected?The question is perhaps even more elemental. Are you willing to travel this way, based on the premise that you need to lose yourself in order to find yourself?. 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